Construction Inspector – NOC 2264 SDG

55

Number of People Who Work in this Industry

$61,526

Median Income of People Working in this Occupation

63%

Chance this Occupation Will Be Impacted by Technology in the Next Decade

93.8%

Participation Rate
Percentage of the number of people currently working in the occupation as compared to the total number of people within the occupation as of the week of
May 1 to May 7 2016

5.4%

Unemployment Rate
Percentage of people looking for work as compared to the total number of people in the occupation as of the week of May 1 to May 7, 2016, when the unemployment rate was 7.8% in SDG and 5.3% in PR.

Education

of People Working in this Occupation

54.5% of the workforce has a secondary school diploma.

18.2% of the workforce has a College, CEGEP or non-university certificate or diploma.

18.2% of the workforce has an apprenticeship or trade certificate.

Age of the Workforce

in this Occupation

63.6% of the workforce is age 45 to 64.

Sectors that Employ this Occupation

37.5% of construction inspectors work in the Public Administration sector.

25% work in each of the following sectors: Real Estate and Leasing and Utilities.

Employment Outlook

The employment outlook in our region for 2017-2019 is fair.

Projected growth rate in Ontario: 4.1%-5%

 

More Information

What Else Do I Need to Know?

  • The number of businesses operating in the Construction & Utilities sector has grown since 2012 with a net of 34 businesses created between June 2013 and June 2014.
  • The sector locally is comprised of small businesses. 81.5% of businesses operating in the Construction & Utilities sector employ 4 people or less.
  • Employment Outlook is expected to be good for Construction Inspectors (NOC 2264) in the Ottawa Economic Region.
  • Construction inspectors must have expert level knowledge of building and construction codes, including a thorough understanding of electrical, plumbing, heating, roofing, foundation, and interior and exterior systems. This occupation requires continuous education, due to changes and revisions in building codes and common practices. The rising popularity of drones and advances in the use of technology to complete inspections will increase need for inspectors that are able to adapt to these innovations.
  • Most construction inspectors work in the public administration and professional, scientific and technical services industries; however, this occupation is strongly tied to growth and trends in the construction industry. Although the housing market has eased after growth in key regions, projects involving transit infrastructure engineering and non-residential construction are expected to sustain the demand for inspectors in the province. Demand is lower in the winter months due to the decline of construction activity during cold weather. Construction inspectors were insulated from the late-2000’s recession because of the low interest rates that followed, which sustained the strong housing market in key areas of Ontario, in addition to construction projects that were supported through government stimulus.
  • Nearly one in three construction inspectors are 55 and over, potentially creating a number of vacancies due to retirement. This occupation offers some self-employment opportunities, as one-sixth of construction inspectors are self-employed.
  • For more information directly from local employers about this occupation, click on Construction & Utilities Services Sector.